Research

Why is it so crucial for research, politicians and NGOs to engage with grassroots organisations on the topic of statelessness?

  • 1 March 2024
  • 0 replies
  • 42 views
Why is it so crucial for research, politicians and NGOs to engage with grassroots organisations on the topic of statelessness?

By Lea Böhringer

[German version below 👇🏼]

Statelessness – whenever I bring up my dissertation topic in conversations with my friends, colleagues or even professors, many of them ask me this exact same question: What exactly do you mean by this? I, myself, had no idea of the concept a while ago. This comes from a privileged perspective where I never had to worry about passport issues. I first came across someone with a lived experience of statelessness when I made an acquaintance with a refugee from Eritrea. We became friends and he told me about how he was stuck in limbo in Germany because he has no access to his papers due to fleeing his country and cannot prove his identity. He hadn’t left Germany or seen his family for 7 years. I kept thinking about his situation for months until I came across the term statelessness and I was struck by what I found. The UN counts 4-10 million stateless people worldwide – while so many cases stay unreported. The Statelessness Convention of 1954 defines this status of “a person who is not considered as a national by any State under the operation of its law” (Art. 1)”.

There are very diverse reasons why people become stateless. For instance, the rise of the modern state system failed to accommodate certain groups, such as the Roma and Kurds. Some become stateless because of the dissolution of their state and war. Others fall victim to the consequences of post-colonial agreements that excluded particular groups. Changing citizenship laws and discriminatory practices are other reasons why people are rendered stateless. Moreover, statelessness can affect migrants and refugees who cannot prove their nationality due to a lack of access to documents. Lastly, children are particularly affected if they are either born to stateless parents or lack birth registration. Some children are denied citizenship when born to LGBTQI+ families, particularly in countries where citizenship can only be derived from the father’s nationality. Consequently, most of the time, it is the state that “produced illegality” (Zorn, 2013, p. 807) by allowing or enabling gaps in nationality laws.

Recognising the complexity of statelessness and the widespread lack of understanding, I decided to undertake more research on the topic as part of my master’s degree. While legal journals provided insights, they fell short of capturing what to me sounded more than just a legal technicality. Therefore, to enhance research in this field and create a deeper understanding of the topic, I spoke to organisations and initiatives in Germany, Italy and Spain that were founded by stateless persons themselves (=grassroots organisations). In the following sections, I will share the findings and conclusions drawn from my research.

 

Why is it important for policy, research and practice to engage with grassroots levels? 

Research suggests that consulting grassroots organisations can lead to more sustainable and effective policy solutions. It ensures that policies and programmes target the needs of affected persons and enables continuous monitoring of their immediate impacts. Furthermore, involving grassroots organisations in policy-making can provide insight into the underlying causes and thus, contribute to more structural change. Lastly, these forms of civil society involvement strengthen democracies and rebuild trust in governments (Atkinson et al. 2009).

However, scholars point out that grassroots campaigns may be compromised by the work of NGOs and INGOs. This happens when grassroots organisations get discouraged in their work because larger NGOs have more resources, the technical know-how in producing reports and have better access to data and key stakeholders. When this happens, development work runs the risk of “speak{ing} for people instead of assisting them to speak for themselves” (Atkinson et al., 2009, p. 12).

 

So, why is the topic of statelessness mostly absent from the international agenda, although there is an urgent need to address it?

For that, Lindsey Kingston (2013) tried to develop an explanation. She conducted interviews with high-level actors in the humanitarian and human rights field in the US. She found that for reasons of complexity, lack of data, tangible solutions and political will, and a “missing ‘CNN factor’” (Kingston, 2013, p. 81), the topic is not a favoured issue for agenda-setting. While this is the frustrating reality of politics, this should not be a valid reason for a lack of engagement with the topic. States are obliged to address the prevention of statelessness under the Statelessness Convention of 1954 and 1961, as well as part of the development goals of the Agenda 2030 under point 16.9 (4). Moreover, discussions around statelessness are linked to discourses on migration, poverty, the protection of human rights and governance. Unquestionably, democratic states have a responsibility to address statelessness.

 

Conceptualising Statelessness:

To be able to increase the understanding of the topic and to discuss more tangible solutions, research plays a crucial role. Conceptualising statelessness legally or for advocacy purposes is challenging because of the diversity of people affected and the differences in legal conditions. Therefore, by speaking to grassroots initiatives founded by stateless people themselves, the aim of my research was to investigate how they make sense of the term and how their approaches differ from past research, current policy and NGO work. The following graphic gives an overview of the themes that emerged in relation to the term statelessness in interviews and the organisations’ advocacy documents:

These findings highlight the areas policy can focus upon if the aim is to reflect affected persons’ lived realities. It shows that the topic needs to be approached in its complexity and interdisciplinarity. Focusing solely on the issue of acquiring national identity will not solve the underlying structural inequalities that led to statelessness in the first place. Also, by only debating theoretical concepts of future scenarios of a world without borders or nationality – as some scholars do –, current needs of those affected by statelessness are not being addressed (cf. Beyer 2022). The findings also demonstrate how statelessness cannot be reduced to just the fact of an absence of nationality but it also has direct consequences on the mental health of affected persons.

 

Gaps and Misconceptions – Striving for tangible solutions

The findings of the interviews give a much more comprehensive overview of statelessness by reflecting the perceptions of those who are affected by it. This also highlights the reason why organisations, like Statefree, engage in advocacy work. As stated by their founders, there is a clear communication gap between those who are working on solutions and those who are actually affected by statelessness. From the data, it became clear that a lack of awareness, misconceptions and access barriers to political arenas are hindering the organisations’ work as well as the process of finding tangible solutions to end statelessness. Through advocacy work, the initiatives aim to take back control of the narrative, ensuring the concerns and lived realities of stateless populations are represented. Through participatory approaches and the use of technology, they increase their community outreach and engagement. They fill information gaps, increase public awareness and ensure a safe space for people to share their experiences.

 

What can we learn from these findings for future research, policy and advocacy?

Stateless people are placed outside of a world system that demands everyone to “be a citizen of somewhere” (Belton, 2013, p. 223). This cannot be an acceptable situation in our global governance system. To change this, it needs to be understood that the issue of statelessness is complex and necessitates a multifaceted approach, wherein each angle taken must be informed by the others and not in isolation. This is done by addressing legal implications, while also discussing effects on mental health and fulfilling basic human rights and needs. Moreover, the situation of stateless people is context-specific and requires attention to national laws and procedures. While in Germany there is a stronger need to solve the issue of ‘undetermined nationality’ and in situ statelessness, in Spain, the statelessness grassroots campaign has a specific link to the Saharawis community due to Spain’s colonial past. Thus, statelessness is also interlinked with dealing with displacement and decolonialisation measures. While there is a need for context-specificity, all organisations agreed that European networks are needed for exchanging best practices and ideas. To counteract governments’ fatigue with the complexity of the issue, barriers to accessing democratic spaces should be removed so that stateless persons can speak for themselves, ensuring more effective solutions can be found.

Furthermore, discriminatory practices highlighted in the interviews are crucial to research on statelessness as they point out the underlying root causes of the problem. A few scholars have given this further thought. Lindsey Kingston (2017), for instance, draws attention to the problem that many stateless persons do not have access to a nationality because they belong to a marginalised group that already encounters discriminatory practices by society or governments. However, citizenship does not necessarily spare people from marginalisation either and some forms of oppression will not end once legal identity is established. As a consequence, Michiel Bot urges that for the politics of stateless people to be successful, it needs to engage with the politics of anti-racism (Bot, 2019, p. 197).

Lastly, I want to end with a statement from one of the interviewees who expressed that sometimes people simply want to be heard and asked: “How have you felt? How has it shaped you? How has it shaped your personality, your character?”

 

I want to thank all interview participants for your trust in speaking to me and would like to keep this an open discussion for everyone to contribute their thoughts.

 

References:

Atkinson, J. et al. (2009) Globalizing Social Justice. London: Palgrave Macmillan UK. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230277939.

Belton, K.A. (2013) ‘Statelessness and Economic and Social Rights’, in L. Minkler (ed.) The State of Economic and Social Human Rights. 1st edn. Cambridge University Press, pp. 221–248. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139235600.011.

Beyer, J. (2022) ‘The common sense of expert activists: practitioners, scholars, and the problem of statelessness in Europe’, Dialectical Anthropology, 46(4), pp. 457–473. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10624-022-09666-5.

Bot, M. (2019) ‘The Conditions of “Savages”? Statelessness, Politics, and Race in Hannah Arendt’s The Origins of Totalitarianism’, The Statelessness & Citizenship Review, 1(2), pp. 195–213. Available at: https://statelessnessandcitizenshipreview.com/index.php/journal/article/view/93.

Kingston, L.N. (2013) ‘“A Forgotten Human Rights Crisis”: Statelessness and Issue (Non)Emergence’, Human Rights Review, 14(2), pp. 73–87. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12142-013-0264-4.

Kingston, L.N. (2017) ‘Worthy of rights: Statelessness as a cause and symptom of marginalisation’, in T. Bloom, K. Tonkiss, and P. Cole (eds) Understanding statelessness: lives in limbo. Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY: Routledge (Routledge studies in human rights, 4), pp. 17–34. Available at: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781315200460-3/worthy-rights-lindsey-kingston.

Zorn, J. (2013) ‘Citizenship practices of non-citizens in Slovenia: “you cannot fight the system alone”’, Citizenship Studies, 17(6–7), pp. 803–816. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/13621025.2013.834132.

 

*****

Warum ist es für Forschung, Politik und NGOs so wichtig, sich mit sog. Grassroots-Organisationen zum Thema Staatenlosigkeit auseinanderzusetzen?

Von Lea Böhringer

Staatenlosigkeit – jedes Mal, wenn ich mein Masterarbeitsthema in Gesprächen mit Freund*innen, Kolleg*innen oder auch Professor*innen anspreche, stellen mir viele von ihnen immer wieder die gleiche Frage: Was genau verstehst du darunter? Ich selbst hatte bis vor einiger Zeit noch keine Vorstellung von dem Begriff. Dies kommt jedoch von einer privilegierten Perspektive, in der ich mir nie Gedanken über Reisepassangelegenheiten machen musste. Ich bin zum ersten Mal jemandem begegnet, der die Erfahrung der Staatenlosigkeit gemacht hat, als ich die Bekanntschaft einer geflüchteten Person aus Eritrea machte. Wir freundeten uns an, und er erzählte mir, wie er sich hier in Deutschland in einem Limbo-Zustand befindet, weil er aufgrund seiner Flucht keinen Zugang zu seinen Papieren hat und seine Identität nicht beweisen kann. Seit 7 Jahren hatte er Deutschland nicht verlassen und seine Familie nicht besuchen können. Ich habe monatelang über seine Situation nachgedacht, bis ich auf den Begriff "Staatenlosigkeit" stieß, und ich war erstaunt über das, was ich fand. Die UNO zählt weltweit 4-10 Millionen staatenlose Menschen – wobei die Dunkelziffer wahrscheinlich noch viel höher ist. Das Staatenlosigkeitsabkommen von 1954 definiert diesen Status als: „eine Person, die kein Staat auf Grund seines Rechtes als Staatsangehörigen ansieht.“ (Art. 1)

Es gibt sehr unterschiedliche Gründe, warum Menschen staatenlos werden. Beispielsweise hat die Entstehung des modernen Staatssystems bestimmte Gruppen wie die Roma und Kurden nicht integriert. Einige Menschen werden aufgrund der Auflösung ihres Staates oder durch Krieg staatenlos. Andere wiederrum sind von den Folgen postkolonialer Abkommen betroffen, die bestimmte Gruppen vom Staatsbürgerschaftsrecht ausschließen. Sich ändernde Gesetze und diskriminierende Praktiken sind weitere Gründe dafür, weshalb Menschen staatenlos werden. Darüber hinaus kann es Migrant*innen und Geflüchtete betreffen, die ihre Staatsangehörigkeit nicht nachweisen können, weil sie keinen Zugang zu Dokumenten haben. Schließlich sind vor allem Kinder betroffen, wenn ihr Eltern staatenlos oder sie bei ihrer Geburt nicht registriert worden sind. Einigen Kindern wird die Staatsbürgerschaft verweigert, wenn sie in LGBTQI+ Familien hineingeboren werden, insbesondere in Ländern, in denen die Staatsbürgerschaft nur von seitens des Vaters abgeleitet werden kann. Folglich ist es in den meisten Fällen der Staat, der "Illegalität produziert" (Zorn, 2013, S. 807), indem er Lücken im Staatsangehörigkeitsrecht zulässt oder ermöglicht.

Angesichts der Komplexität des Themas und des allgemein fehlenden Bewusstseins beschloss ich, mich im Rahmen meines Masterstudiums eingehender mit diesem Thema zu befassen. Juristische Fachzeitschriften boten zwar Einblicke in die Thematik, jedoch reichten sie nicht aus, um zu erfassen, was für mich mehr als nur eine rechtliche Formalität zu sein schien. Um die Forschung in diesem Bereich voranzutreiben und ein tieferes Verständnis für das Thema zu entwickeln, sprach ich mit Organisationen, die in Deutschland, Italien und Spanien im Bereich der Staatenlosigkeit tätig und von staatenlosen Menschen gegründet worden sind (=Grassroots-Organisationen). In den folgenden Abschnitten möchte ich einen Einblick in die Ergebnisse und Schlussfolgerungen meiner Forschung geben.

 

Warum ist es für Politik, Forschung und Praxis wichtig, sich mit Grassroots-Organisationen zu befassen? 

Forschungsergebnisse legen nahe, dass der Austausch mit sog. Grassroots-Initiativen zu nachhaltigeren und wirksameren politischen Lösungen führen kann. Dadurch kann sichergestellt werden, dass politischen Maßnahmen und Programme auf die Bedürfnisse der Betroffenen ausgerichtet sind und eine kontinuierliche Nachverfolgung der unmittelbaren Auswirkungen ermöglicht wird. Darüber hinaus kann die Einbeziehung von Grassroots-Organisationen Einblicke in die zugrunde liegenden Ursachen geben und so zu einem stärkeren strukturellen Wandel beitragen. Schließlich stärken diese Formen des zivilgesellschaftlichen Engagements Demokratien und das Vertrauen in Regierungen (Atkinson et al. 2009).

Wissenschaftler*innen weisen jedoch darauf hin, dass Kampagnen von Grassroots-Organisationen durch die Arbeit von NGOs beeinträchtigt werden können. Dies geschieht, wenn lokale Initiativen in ihrer Arbeit entmutigt werden, weil größere (internationale) NGOs über mehr Ressourcen, technisches Know-how bei der Erstellung von Berichten verfügen und einen besseren Zugang zu Daten und wichtigen Interessengruppen haben. Wenn dies geschieht, läuft Entwicklungszusammenarbeit Gefahr, "für betroffene Menschen zu sprechen, anstatt sie dabei zu unterstützen, für sich selbst zu sprechen" (Atkinson et al., 2009, S. 12, original englisch).

 

Warum also ist das Thema Staatenlosigkeit auf der internationalen Agenda meist nicht vertreten, obwohl es dringend behandelt werden müsste?

Lindsey Kingston (2013) hat versucht, dafür eine Erklärung zu finden. Sie führte dazu Interviews mit hochrangigen Akteur*innen im Bereich der humanitären Hilfe und im Menschenrechtskontext in den USA durch. Sie stellte fest, dass das Thema aus Gründen der Komplexität, des Mangels an Daten, greifbaren Lösungen und politischem Willen sowie eines "fehlenden 'CNN-Faktors'" (Kingston, 2013, S. 81) kein beliebtes Thema für das Agenda-Setting ist. Dies ist zwar die frustrierende Realität der Politik, sollte jedoch kein Grund für eine mangelnde Auseinandersetzung mit dem Thema sein. Staaten sind verpflichtet, sich mit der Prävention von Staatenlosigkeit im Rahmen der Staatenlosigkeits-Konventionen von 1954 und 1961 zu befassen; und dies ist auch Teil der Entwicklungsziele der Agenda 2030 unter Punkt 16.9 (4). Darüber hinaus sind Diskussionen über Staatenlosigkeit mit Diskursen zu Migration, Armut, dem Schutz der Menschenrechte und verantwortungsvoller Staatsführung verbunden. Es steht somit außer Frage, dass demokratische Staaten die Verantwortung haben, die Bekämpfung von Staatenlosigkeit ernst zu nehmen.

 

Konzeptualisierung von Staatenlosigkeit:

Um das Verständnis für das Thema zu verbessern und konkretere Lösungen zu diskutieren, spielt die Forschung eine entscheidende Rolle. Die Konzeptualisierung von Staatenlosigkeit in rechtlicher Hinsicht oder zu Zwecken der Advocacy-Arbeit ist aufgrund der Vielfalt der betroffenen Menschen und der unterschiedlichen rechtlichen Bedingungen eine Herausforderung. Durch Gespräche mit Organisationen, die von staatenlosen Menschen gegründet wurden, wollte ich daher untersuchen, wie sie den Begriff verstehen und wie sich ihre Ansätze von der bisherigen Forschung, der aktuellen Politik und der Arbeit von NGOs unterscheiden. Die folgende Grafik gibt einen Überblick über die Themen, die im Zusammenhang mit dem Begriff der Staatenlosigkeit in den Interviews und in den Dokumenten der Organisationen aufgekommen sind:

 

Diese Ergebnisse zeigen, auf welche Bereiche sich politische Bemühungen konzentrieren können, wenn das Ziel darin besteht, die Lebenswirklichkeit der Betroffenen zu berücksichtigen. Sie zeigen, dass das Thema in seiner Komplexität und Interdisziplinarität angegangen werden muss. Wenn man sich nur auf die Frage des Erwerbs der Staatsangehörigkeit konzentriert, werden die zugrunde liegenden strukturellen Ungleichheiten, die überhaupt erst zu Staatenlosigkeit geführt haben, nicht gelöst. Wenn man sich nur mit theoretischen Zukunftsszenarien einer Welt ohne Grenzen oder Staatsangehörigkeit auseinandersetzt - wie es einige Wissenschaftler*innen tun -, werden die aktuellen Bedürfnisse von Betroffenen außer Acht gelassen (cf. Beyer 2022). Die Ergebnisse zeigen auch, dass Staatenlosigkeit nicht nur auf die Tatsache einer fehlenden legalen Identität reduziert werden kann, sondern auch direkte Auswirkungen auf die psychische Gesundheit der Betroffenen hat.

 

Lücken und Missverständnisse – Das Streben nach handfesten Lösungen

Die Ergebnisse der Interviews geben einen umfassenderen Überblick über Staatenlosigkeit, indem sie die Wahrnehmung der Betroffenen widerspiegeln. Dies verdeutlicht auch den Grund, warum Organisationen wie Statefree Advocacy-Arbeit betreiben. Wie die Mitbegründer*innen bekräftigen, gibt es eine deutliche Kommunikationslücke zwischen denen, die an Lösungen arbeiten, und denen, die tatsächlich von Staatenlosigkeit betroffen sind. Aus den Daten wurde deutlich, dass mangelndes öffentliches Bewusstsein, fehlerhafte Auffassungen und Zugangshürden zu politischen Instanzen die Arbeit der Organisationen sowie den Prozess der Suche nach konkreten Lösungen erschweren. Mit ihrer Advocacy-Arbeit wollen die Initiativen die Steuerung des Diskurses zurückerlangen und sicherstellen, dass die Anliegen und die Lebenswirklichkeit staatenloser Menschen vertreten werden. Durch partizipative Ansätze und den Einsatz von Technologien erhöhen sie die Reichweite und das Engagement in den betroffenen Communities. Sie schließen Informationslücken, sensibilisieren die Öffentlichkeit für das Thema und schaffen einen sicheren Raum, in dem Menschen sich über ihre persönlichen Erfahrungen austauschen können.

 

Was kann man aus diesen Ergebnissen für zukünftige Forschung, Politik und Advocacy-Arbeit lernen?

Staatenlose Menschen befinden sich außerhalb eines Weltsystems, das von jedem verlangt, "Staatsbürger eines bestimmten Landes zu sein" (Belton, 2013, S. 223, original englisch). Dies kann in unserem globalen Staatensystem keine akzeptable Situation sein. Damit sich dies ändert, muss man verstehen, dass das Problem der Staatenlosigkeit komplex ist und einen vielschichtigen Ansatz erfordert, bei dem verschiedene Faktoren sich beeinflussen und nicht isoliert betrachtet werden können. In der Praxis heißt das, dass die gesetzlichen Rahmenbedingungen angegangen werden, aber auch die Auswirkungen auf die psychische Gesundheit und die Erfüllung grundlegender Menschenrechte und Bedürfnisse diskutiert werden müssen. Darüber hinaus ist die Situation staatenloser Menschen kontextspezifisch und erfordert die Beachtung nationaler Gesetze und Verfahren. Während in Deutschland das Problem der "ungeklärten Staatsangehörigkeit" und der in situ Staatenlosigkeit gelöst werden muss, hat die Grassroots-Kampagne in Spanien aufgrund der kolonialen Vergangenheit des Landes einen besonderen Bezug zur Bevölkerungsgruppe der Saharauis. Somit ist die Staatenlosigkeit auch mit Themen, wie Flucht und Dekolonialisierungsmaßnahmen verknüpft. Trotz der Notwendigkeit einer kontextspezifischen Betrachtung waren sich alle Organisationen einig, dass europäische Netzwerke für den Austausch von bewährten Verfahren und Ideen erforderlich sind. Um der Ermüdung der Regierungen angesichts der Komplexität des Themas entgegenzuwirken, sollten Hindernisse für den Zugang zu demokratischen Räumen beseitigt werden. Dies ist notwendig, damit Staatenlose für sich selbst sprechen können und somit wirksamere Lösungen gefunden werden.

Darüber hinaus sind die diskriminierenden Praktiken, die in den Interviews hervorgehoben wurden, für die Erforschung der Staatenlosigkeit von entscheidender Bedeutung, da sie auf die grundlegenden Ursachen des Problems hinweisen. Einige Wissenschaftler*innen haben diese Thematik weiter untersucht. Lindsey Kingston (2017) beispielsweise macht auf das Problem aufmerksam, dass viele Staatenlose keinen Zugang zu einer Staatsangehörigkeit haben, weil sie einer Randgruppe angehören, die bereits diskriminierende Erfahrungen seitens der Gesellschaft oder der Regierungen macht. Allerdings schützt auch die Staatsbürgerschaft nicht unbedingt vor Marginalisierung, und einige Formen der Unterdrückung enden nicht, nur weil eine rechtliche Identität hergestellt wurde. Michiel Bot argumentiert daher, dass die politische Arbeit staatenloser Menschen nur dann erfolgreich sein kann, wenn sie Antirassismus-Politik einhergeht (Bot, 2019, S. 197).

Abschließend möchte ich mit einer Aussage eines Interviewpartners enden, der zum Ausdruck brachte, dass Menschen manchmal einfach nur gehört und gefragt werden wollen: "Wie haben Sie sich gefühlt? Wie hat es Sie geprägt? Wie hat es Ihre Persönlichkeit, Ihren Charakter geformt?"

 

Ich möchte mich bei allen Interviewteilnehmenden für das entgegengebrachte Vertrauen bedanken. Zudem würde ich es begrüßen die Diskussion zu diesem Thema offen zu halten, damit jede*r seine Gedanken einbringen kann.

 

Quellen:

Atkinson, J. et al. (2009) Globalizing Social Justice. London: Palgrave Macmillan UK. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230277939.

Belton, K.A. (2013) ‘Statelessness and Economic and Social Rights’, in L. Minkler (ed.) The State of Economic and Social Human Rights. 1st edn. Cambridge University Press, pp. 221–248. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139235600.011.

Beyer, J. (2022) ‘The common sense of expert activists: practitioners, scholars, and the problem of statelessness in Europe’, Dialectical Anthropology, 46(4), pp. 457–473. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10624-022-09666-5.

Bot, M. (2019) ‘The Conditions of “Savages”? Statelessness, Politics, and Race in Hannah Arendt’s The Origins of Totalitarianism’, The Statelessness & Citizenship Review, 1(2), pp. 195–213. Available at: https://statelessnessandcitizenshipreview.com/index.php/journal/article/view/93.

Kingston, L.N. (2013) ‘“A Forgotten Human Rights Crisis”: Statelessness and Issue (Non)Emergence’, Human Rights Review, 14(2), pp. 73–87. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12142-013-0264-4.

Kingston, L.N. (2017) ‘Worthy of rights: Statelessness as a cause and symptom of marginalisation’, in T. Bloom, K. Tonkiss, and P. Cole (eds) Understanding statelessness: lives in limbo. Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY: Routledge (Routledge studies in human rights, 4), pp. 17–34. Available at: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781315200460-3/worthy-rights-lindsey-kingston.

Zorn, J. (2013) ‘Citizenship practices of non-citizens in Slovenia: “you cannot fight the system alone”’, Citizenship Studies, 17(6–7), pp. 803–816. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/13621025.2013.834132.

 


0 replies

Be the first to reply!

Reply