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A stateless man and a German soldier

  • 15 May 2022
  • 7 replies
  • 126 views

Userlevel 3

Dear brother, dear sister,

let me share with you my long and tiring experience, forgive me if I write with simple words put down in naked frustration. Let me share part of my story, so you know what kinds of life are possible for men to live. So you know of men who belong to no country, who have less rights than a dog in Europe, who haven't, since before 2014, known a peaceful night of sleep not invaded by the fiery missiles launched at our parent's home from a roaring F-16 fighter aircraft, chasing us through the cracked grey streets of our childhood memories.

I was one of the stateless in Belgium. A man, they told me, who belonged to no nation. Only GOD recognized me now.

On my long walk from Stoney Greece to Belgium, I was captured near München, Germany. The Army there seemed to be waiting for me and would not let me walk further, and although my feet ached and were swollen, my stomach was empty, my brain was hot and dizzy, although I was sore from my knees up to my shoulders, I wanted to continue walking to where my brother was residing in Belgium. But the Germans wouldn't let me continue. Instead of granting my request to keep walking, they insulted me for abandoning my home which was now so far away, and they forced me to give them my fingerprints before going into the custody of the German government.

„Coward, why did you not stay to fix the trouble in your homeland? Why do you bother us here?“ The German soldier looked as friendly as the snarling dog he kept chained by his side.

Trying to lift my head and look with some self-respect into the German's eyes, I spoke,

„Look, the only option in my homeland is violence. There are no jobs, even for someone with a degree...but I don't believe that violence is going to help my family, I don't believe in violence, my people, my...“

He pushed me forward before I could finish my explanation. It was obvious that he expected and heard no answer to his insult. I was just another oxygen thief causing him more paperwork. It seemed that probably his insult was standard, something he said to every face that he had to process. No explanation I could have given would have won his sympathy or recognition as a human being, someone with a story, with dreams, many broken dreams, a human being who desperately needed respect and hope, just like anyone else.

Far away in Belgium, my younger brother, whom I hadn't seen in many years, four years younger than I and more of the sensitive type than me, was worried waiting for any report of my location, or even my appearance in Belgium at any time. Now he would have to wait even longer than my sore feet could carry me to Belgium. But how long? A week? A month? A year? Five years? Who could say?

I remember when we were boys. He was always the patient one. The youngest of four proud brothers; he was both sensitive and fearless. How much I missed him. But I couldn't think about that now or the -swear word hidden- in the military transport would read the weakness in my face and probably smile. I couldn't bear that. I will be a statue for now, at least until I am alone again, then probably I will cry...I didn't make it to Belgium yet. What will I tell my mother?

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Best answer by pdiffenderfer 17 May 2022, 19:14

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7 replies

Thanks for sharing your story, Omar. This must have been quite the experience for you. Fleeing from war and then having to go through the stress at the border in this content is something that is unimaginable for some of us.

We in no way want to disregard your anger about the situation, but as we are an open community, we also want to just mention that we want to nurture a culture of healthy and non-violent language. Which is why, we would highly appreciate it, if you would replace the word “a**holes”.

Thank you again for sharing your resilience with us.🙏

Userlevel 5
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Thank you Omar ❤️

Thank you sir for not giving up...I know that people like you will eventually rise to the top...you haven’t become bitter but you share your wisdom as your way to handle your tough background.
People like you will be our future leaders. 

best luck and strength to your family!!!

Thanks for sharing your story, Omar. This must have been quite the experience for you. Fleeing from war and then having to go through the stress at the border in this content is something that is unimaginable for some of us.

We in no way want to disregard your anger about the situation, but as we are an open community, we also want to just mention that we want to nurture a culture of healthy and non-violent language. Which is why, we would highly appreciate it, if you would replace the word “a**holes”.

Thank you again for sharing your resilience with us.🙏

Georgi, out of respect for the injustice Omar faced, you could have written him privately to persuade him about what you think is the proper use of language and give Omar the chance to determine on his own how he believes he must express himself. Democracy means that people are allowed to disagree and still be heard...language is the first victim in war.
Public language policing on this site makes a louder negative statement than Omar’s honest show of anger.
Just delete Omar’s post if you can’t persuade him that your idea of language is the only correct one. If you fail to persuade him to voluntarily accept your language politic, then allow him the right to be an individual. Honesty is more important than politeness when it comes to life and death matters.

For example, it would be wrong to ask a drowning child to lower his voice before we rescue him. 

Part of the reason there is zero progress in the fight for global justice is because those on the side on justice refuse to get their hands dirty, have no idea how to fight, and put peace and politeness before justice.

Peace and politeness is our goal, but we can only get there through honesty and justice. 

Userlevel 3

@pdiffenderfer, thanks so much for voicing your opinion in this and sharing your feedback with us straight forwardly. Our intention was in no way to disrespect Omar but only to be transparent  - and the way you have jumped in to support Omar is exactly the kind of allyship we are hoping to nurture in this community! :) 

Userlevel 3

Thank you for being so open and personal with us @Pali Omar! May something positive come out of this story, for you and others🙏🏻

@Charlotte I try also to reduce the anger of those suffering in my activism, but that is a dangerous thing because if it gets bottled-up, it can become explosive. It is so difficult to find a way to heal and make something positive out of the many tragedies. I know that is our goal. I hope that some of those we care about can use the rough experiences to strengthen themselves and become great leaders for a better tomorrow...thank you for helping them do that, that means everything 

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